Live Q&A at the Press Room

We had a good turnout for the opening of my photography exhibit “Fire and Dust” at the Press Club in Monterey last week. The event included a live interview with Bradley Zeve of the Monterey County Weekly and some great questions from the audience.

Thanks to Bradley for hosting and moderating the discussion (and for the thoughtful questions) and to Jack Peterson of the Media Center for Art Education and Technology for taping the event for broadcast (to be aired on MCAET throughout March and April — check listings here).

Below is an edited 51-minute video of our conversation.

Fire and Dust – A New Show in Monterey

It’s weird to see Shepard Fairey’s work come down and my own go up. I’ve been a fan of his art for a long, long time.

We’re kicking off a new show today, this one in Monterey. It’s called “Fire and Dust” and features a decade of my Burning Man photography.

The show is in a cafe/art venue/public gathering place called The Press Room. The exhibition is curated by the Winfield Gallery.

Seems like there are a lot of people involved. There is a lot of enthusiasm about the show. Hopefully it will translate into a decent turnout at the reception and live Q&A in two weeks.

If you happen to be in or near Monterey on March 10th, I hope you’ll come by!

The show itself runs through April 15th.

More info below…

Scott London at the Press Club in Monterey

Exhibition in Telluride

 

This week I’ll be in Colorado exhibiting my work at the Telluride Gallery of Fine Art. The show opens on Thursday with an artist reception. I’ll also be signing copies of the newly published Second Edition of Burning Man: Art on Fire at Between the Covers, the local bookseller and café.

The gallery show coincides with the annual Telluride Fire Festival, now in its third year. The event is billed as a community celebration of excellence in interactive fire arts. It runs three nights and features huge, interactive, fire-emitting art installations, world-class fire performers, fire spinning workshops, and other activities. Should be quite a party.

I spoke about the exhibition with Cara Pallone of KOTO Public Radio. You can hear the 7-minute interview here:

If you’re in or near Telluride, make a point of checking out the festival and please stop in at the gallery reception. Here are the details: Scott London Artist Reception at the Telluride Gallery of Fine Art.

Painted Desert

The Painted Desert series grew out of a great collaboration with the performance troupe Vessel. The project was commissioned by the Mesa Arts Center and is perhaps best described as a merging of photography, costume design and performance art. We put a lot of planning and hard work into an initial photoshoot in the Painted Desert. But the real highlight of the project was presenting it in front of a live audience—as we have now done at several venues in Arizona, including Spark Festival in Mesa, the Public Art Program in Glendale and, earlier this month, the Phoenix Art Museum.

As a photographer, I’ve presented my images in a variety of formats and venues over the years—magazines, gallery shows, books, film, etc. But this is the first time I’ve used photography as part of an interactive experience. The photographs are projected on people and objects as part of the performance. When we presented the show at the Mesa Arts Center, the entire complex became a moving art gallery of sorts, with images flowing across walls, ceilings, floors, and even people in the audience. As you can see in the photos below, the Vessel performers became living screens for the projected images. (In the fourth image, I appear alongside Rachel Bowditch, camera in hand.)

Spark! Festival Spark! FestivalSpark! FestivalSpark! Festival

Vessel is the brainchild of Rachel Bowditch, a respected performance artist recently named one of today’s 100 top creatives by Origin Magazine. It was a joy and an honor to work with her. For more about Rachel’s work, check out her website Vessel Project.

Here are a few more photos from the series. For more images, check out the slideshow here.

 

Solstice 2016

Each year at the end of June, Santa Barbara, California, officially kicks off summer with a three-day solstice party. The highlight of the weekend is a parade famous for its whimsical floats, colorful stiltwalkers, goofy performance artists, Brazilian drummers, and giggling kids donning masks, costumes, and painted faces, and of course the amazing samba dancers wearing feathers and sequins (and not much else). The annual event got its start in 1974 and now attracts upward of 100,000 visitors and more than 1,000 participants from near and far.

The 2016 theme, “Legends,” evoked lots of characters from American folklore and Greek Mythology, from Paul Bunyan and Tarzan to Medusa and Aphrodite. There were a couple of floats commemorating the late artist Prince—a legend of a different sort. Santa Barbara Mayor Helene Schneider, donning an inspired airplane costume, came as Amelia Earhart. Inevitably, a pair of Elvis Presley and Donald Trump impersonators made an appearance. And because the Solstice festivities coincided with Pride weekend in cities like San Francisco and New York this year, there were more than a few same-sex couples waving bright rainbow flags.

Below are a few of my photos. You can check out the complete set here.

For the complete set, go to: Santa Barbara Solstice 2016

See also photos from previous years: 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, and 2010