Painted Desert

The Painted Desert series grew out of a collaboration with the performance troupe Vessel. Part photography, part costume design, and part interactive performance, the project was commissioned by the Mesa Arts Center last year.

A lot of planning and hard work went into the photoshoot in the Painted Desert and it was immensely fun. But the real highlight of the project was presenting the work at the Spark! Festival in Mesa, Arizona.

As a photographer, I’ve presented my images in a variety of formats and venues over the years—magazines, gallery shows, books, film, etc. But the Spark! performance was something altogether new for me. We projected the photographs on people and objects as part of the performance piece. The entire arts complex became a moving art gallery of sorts, with images flowing across walls, ceilings, floors, and even people in the audience.

As you can see in the photos below, the Vessel performers became living screens for the projected images.

Spark! Festival  Spark! FestivalSpark! Festival

Vessel is the brainchild of Rachel Bowditch, a respected performance artist recently named one of today’s 100 top creatives by Origin Magazine. It was a joy and an honor to work with her. For more about Rachel’s work, check out her website Vessel Project.

Here are a few more photos from the series. For more images, check out the slideshow here.



Steampunk is a curious aesthetic, an unlikely mix of seemingly incompatible frames of reference. Inspired by science fiction and informed by 19th-century industrial machinery, it’s part Victorian England, part wild west Americana, and part 21st-century nostalgia. It seems to be everywhere now, from fashion runways and design houses to artist collectives and Makers Faires.

I never set out to focus on the phenomenon per se, but hanging out with artists, engineers, sculptors, builders, designers, and other creative types, and carrying a camera, has meant that I’ve been on hand to document some great steampunk projects.

My photographs have been exhibited at two recent shows — the Scottsdale Center for the Performing Arts’s exhibition Steampunk: The Exquisite Adventure and the San Diego Automotive Museum’s show Steam Punk. A handful are also included in a new book, Steampunk, by German author, curator, collector, and steampunk aficionado Dan Aetherman.

The Nautilus by Sean Orlando and Christopher Bently at Burning Man 2011 (Photo by Scott London)
Steampunk performer at the Solstice Celebration in Santa Barbara, California. (Photo by Scott London)



Moving Europe

I love public art, and here’s a cool project I’ve been part of that gives added meaning to the term. It’s from an open-air photo exhibition where artists and performers take to the streets playing music, spinning hoops, walking on stilts, and carrying large prints of interactive art installations. The project has been popping up in cities across Europe, including Athens, Amsterdam, and Antwerp.

The project was masterminded by filmmaker Jan Beddegenoodts, with photographs by Gaby Thijsse, Thomas Dorn, Sidney Erthal, and myself. Later this year, we’ll be taking it to Berlin, Lisbon, Riga, and even Reykjavik.

For more on the project, check out Jan’s video below, or head over to his site: Moving Europe


Default World Dreaming

"Star Seed" by Scott London

“Default World Dreaming” is a new show opening today at Gallery 151 in New York City. I’m excited to be a part of it and to have my work featured alongside an amazing roster of talented artists.

The show ranges widely but takes inspiration from the unique culture and ethos of Burning Man. The annual festival represents a curious and dynamic world of opposites — the ephemeral world that rises out of the Black Rock Desert of Nevada each summer, and the established, accepted, and socially constructed reality of our daily lives.

To those in the Burning Man community, quotidian life is often referred to as “the default world.” It stands in stark contrast to the culture of Burning Man which is exemplified by self-reliance, non-commodification, gift giving, and radical self-expression. For those who attend Burning Man, these values can be so creative and so liberating that they feel more real than the “real” world.

The exhibition looks at the dichotomy between living in a default world and dreaming of an alternate world, one suffused with creative extravagance and limitless possibility.

The show runs through April 19, 2014. For more information, please visit Gallery 151.


Art In an Ephemeral Age

“Art in an Ephemeral Age” is the theme of the Institute of Art and Ideas’ annual Art Festival at Hay in England, and among the many highlights this year is a look at Burning Man, perhaps the world’s preeminent gathering of ephemeral artists. Several discussion forums will tackle the subject of temporal art and performance artist Sarah Appleby will offer her own inimitable take on Burning Man.

Although I’m not able to attend the event, I was invited to exhibit some of my Burning Man photographs at the Globe, a converted church in Hay on Wye, which serves as the festival’s primary venue. The exhibit features over two dozen of my photos covering the last five years of the Burning Man festival. The show runs from November 13-28. More details here.