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Live Q&A at the Press Room

We had a good turnout for the opening of my photography exhibit “Fire and Dust” at the Press Club in Monterey last week. The event included a live interview with Bradley Zeve of the Monterey County Weekly and some great questions from the audience.

Thanks to Bradley for hosting and moderating the discussion (and for the thoughtful questions) and to Jack Peterson of the Media Center for Art Education and Technology for taping the event for broadcast (to be aired on MCAET throughout March and April — check listings here).

Below is an edited 51-minute video of our conversation.

Exhibition in Telluride

 

This week I’ll be in Colorado exhibiting my work at the Telluride Gallery of Fine Art. The show opens on Thursday with an artist reception. I’ll also be signing copies of the newly published Second Edition of Burning Man: Art on Fire at Between the Covers, the local bookseller and café.

The gallery show coincides with the annual Telluride Fire Festival, now in its third year. The event is billed as a community celebration of excellence in interactive fire arts. It runs three nights and features huge, interactive, fire-emitting art installations, world-class fire performers, fire spinning workshops, and other activities. Should be quite a party.

I spoke about the exhibition with Cara Pallone of KOTO Public Radio. You can hear the 7-minute interview here:

If you’re in or near Telluride, make a point of checking out the festival and please stop in at the gallery reception. Here are the details: Scott London Artist Reception at the Telluride Gallery of Fine Art.

Trajectoire

The current issue of Swiss magazine Trajectoire features a ten-page feature about my Burning Man photography. Most of the images were taken this past year (including two taken with collaborator Philippe Meicler). The spread also includes a write-up by Aline Lalliard that describes Burning Man and delves into some biographical stuff about me. Freely translated from the French, the intro reads:

“For over a decade, Burning Man has come to life through the lens of American photographer Scott London. Fascinated by this annual paean to creativity, he says he’s drawn in by the sheer beauty of the art, the people and the desert backdrop. With images suffused with emotion and humanity, he evokes the essence of an event that defies convention.”

Beautifully put, and a lovely compliment. My thanks to Lalliard and the editors at Trajectoire.

Here’s a thumbnail glance at the other eight pages in the spread:

Burning Man 2015

Burning Man 2015 Photos by Scott London

Burning Man 2015 will be remembered for the wind, the dust, and the unseasonably chilly temperatures. But it was also a year of first-rate art installations, stunning fire performances, startling art cars, burning pianos flying through the air, and much else besides. It was my 4th year covering the event for Rolling Stone and if you head over to their site you’ll find about 20 images of mine gathered under the heading, See Trippy, Surreal Photos From Burning Man 2015. Some of the same images also appear here (but without the pesky ads!), along with about 80 others that try to capture something of the art, the people, and the performances from an all-around incredible week.

View photos

This Happened Here

A few weeks ago, the producers of Discovery’s “This Happened Here” contacted me about an image I had made at Burning Man in 2011. The series features short documentaries that revolve around compelling or unusual photographs.

I answered some questions about the photo and reflected on why I happen to love making pictures at the event.

They have just posted a new episode under the title, “Can Burning Man Change Your Life?” As it turns out, they let me do most of the talking.

Check out the clip above, or read more about it here.

The timing couldn’t be better, as I’m scrambling to get ready for Burning Man 2015 which kicks off in just a few short days.